A collaborative approach to enhancing resilience in high risk and isolated communities

The 6th Australian and New Zealand Disaster and Emergency Management Conference will be held next week over 22 – 23 May at The Star Gold Coast (previously Jupiter’s), Queensland.

Mrs Julia Cook, Disaster Management Support Officer with the Qld Police Service joins us to discuss ‘A collaborative approach to enhancing resilience in high risk and isolated communities’.

Queensland is acknowledged as the most disaster-prone state in Australia. Threats including cyclones, storms, floods, bushfires and industrial accidents take their toll on communities, infrastructure, businesses and the environment.  Increased demand and the limited capacity of emergency services personnel and services means empowering individuals and communities and strengthening community resilience to natural and man-made risks is an increasing priority and challenge.

The My Resilient Community project explores the pathways taken to strengthen community resilience through improving preparedness, response and recovery capacity.  Through this project, emergency services, government and non-government agencies connect with local communities to promote understanding of risks and vulnerabilities and identify skills and contributions individuals can make to further enhance community resilience.

The delivery of the project involves a number of phases including risk assessment; marketing and resilience information sharing; street meets; door knocks; mail outs and the establishment of local community groups to coordinate resilience through prevention, preparation, response and recovery activities.

The framework of the project utilises adaptable, flexible and diverse strategies to facilitate a cultural shift in communities to know the hazards, understand the risks and work with emergency services personnel and each other.  This is a critical step toward enhancing community resilience.

Practical application of the project to date includes work with isolated, island, and extreme risk communities in SEQ.  The case studies adopted diverse strategies according to the unique needs and capacity of the individual communities.  They demonstrated how communities have gained an increased awareness of their risks, the capacity of emergency services and the role individuals and community groups can play in disaster and emergency management.

My Resilient Community uses a holistic and multi-faceted approach to building resilient communities.  The ethos of this project provides a grass-root approach through collaborating with agencies and local volunteer organisations to achieve shared responsibility in community resilience.

For more information on the 2017 Australian & New Zealand Disaster & Emergency Management Conference and to secure your spot, visit www.anzdmc.com.au.

 

Rapid Earthquake Risk Ranking Criteria

The 6th Australian and New Zealand Disaster and Emergency Management Conference will be held next week over 22 – 23 May at The Star Gold Coast.

Prof George Mariano Soriano, Senior Engineer at the Department of Public Works and Highways joins us to discuss Formulation of a Rapid Earthquake Risk Ranking Criteria for National Bridges in the National Capital Region affected by the West Valley Fault using GIS Data Integration’.

In this study, a Rapid Earthquake Risk Ranking Criteria of national bridges near the West Valley Fault was formulated by integrating various existing maps and databases by the Department of Public Works and Highways (DPWH) and Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology (PHIVOLCS).

George Mariano Soriano

Seismic Hazard Parameters were derived from PHIVOLCS fault lines, liquefaction hazard maps, and DPWH geotechnical borehole data. Meanwhile, existing bridge inventory data from the DPWH Road and Bridge Inventory Application (RBIA) was used in order to extract three vulnerability parameters for national bridges namely; bridge condition rating, bridge length, and bridge age.

The study then proposed corresponding hazard and vulnerability scores for the abovementioned parameters which were then given corresponding weights in the computation of the risk rating. The disaster risk equation was used in computing the seismic damage risk rating of all the bridges within the national capital region. In this study, the top five bridges with the highest seismic damage risk rating were presented with a breakdown of their corresponding seismic hazard and vulnerability scores.

The study aims to accomplish three key objectives: identify bridges at risk in the event of an earthquake in the national capital region, optimize existing data by transforming them into a bridge seismic risk assessment criteria, and translate technical data into a simple and quick ranking that can aid policymakers in disaster risk response.

For more information on the 2017 Australian & New Zealand Disaster & Emergency Management Conference and to secure your spot, visit www.anzdmc.com.au.

 

Analysing interoperability between responder agencies at traffic incidents

The 6th Australian and New Zealand Disaster and Emergency Management Conference will be held next week over 22 – 23 May at The Star Gold Coast.

Ms Vanessa Cattermole-Terzic, Principal Behavioural Scientist at the Department of Transport and Main Roads joins us to discuss ‘Analysing interoperability between responder agencies at traffic incidents’.

Vanessa Cattermole-Terzic

Effective traffic incident management optimizes road crash casualty outcomes while minimising the negative flow on effects of incidents, due to congestion. However incident scenes are complex, dynamic environments with distributed intra and inter-agency team functions.

Therefore, determining best practices at individual scenes is not easily evident. Theoretical models from human factors have been shown to effectively analyse complex socio-technical environments and these may be useful for analysing emergency responder functions at traffic incidents. The aim of this study was to investigate the applicability of one such model, Cognitive Work Analysis, as a tool to analyse the traffic incident management workplace, and provide information to improve intra and inter-agency performance and collaboration at incidents.

Results from sections of the Cognitive Work Analysis framework were discussed in this paper. Responders from Queensland Police Service, Queensland Fire and Emergency Services and the Royal Automotive Club Queensland’s Traffic Response Unit participated in a desktop exercise for the study. As anticipated, Cognitive Work Analysis successfully mapped the desktop exercise and identified agency functions, priorities, tasks, and resource requirements, intra and inter-agency collaboration requirements, different operational strategy requirements and produced useful recommendations to further improve traffic incident management.

For more information on the 2017 Australian & New Zealand Disaster & Emergency Management Conference and to secure your spot, visit www.anzdmc.com.au.

 

New Zealand Red Cross Canterbury Earthquake Appeal

The 6th Australian and New Zealand Disaster and Emergency Management Conference will be held next week over 22 – 23 May at The Star Gold Coast.

Ms Sonia Fitchett, Evaluation and Reporting Officer with the New Zealand Red Cross joins us to discuss ‘New Zealand Red Cross Canterbury Earthquake Appeal: Evaluation of a Multi-Year Disaster Recovery Programme in a Developed Country’.

Following the destructive Canterbury earthquakes of 2010 and 2011, New Zealand Red Cross (NZRC) coordinated a national appeal with agreement of local territorial authorities, with the funds being used for a large-scale response and recovery operation that was the first of its kind in the country.

The 2011 Canterbury Earthquake Appeal raised more than $NZ103 million (including interest) in donations from the New Zealand public, and was further supplemented with contributions from international Red Cross Red Crescent societies and corporate sponsorships. This was the largest NZRC appeal since the Second World War.

The NZRC Recovery Programme spanned more than five years and 80 different projects, including $NZ98 million disbursed directly to affected individuals, households, and communities through an extensive cash transfer programme.

Subsequently, an independent evaluation of the Recovery Programme was commissioned for the purpose of assessing what difference was made, and ensuring transparency and accountability to donors. The four key questions were: How much did we do? How well did we do it? What effects did we have? What can we learn for next time?

This evaluation utilised both quantitative and qualitative data to triangulate the reach, impact and success of the NZRC Recovery Programme. It proposes a broad framework of three different types of post-earthquake need through which NZRCs contribution to the wider recovery process can be understood.

This presentation will provide an overview of key findings of interest, as well as insights, reflection and learnings gathered from the five year Recovery Programme.

For more information on the 2017 Australian & New Zealand Disaster & Emergency Management Conference and to secure your spot, visit www.anzdmc.com.au.

 

Impact Assessments – A Whole of Government Approach

The 6th Australian and New Zealand Disaster and Emergency Management Conference will be held this month over 22 – 23 May at The Star Gold Coast (previously Jupiter’s), Queensland.

Ms Nadine Hulme, A/Director Response and Recovery at the Office of Emergency Management, joins us to discuss ‘Impact Assessments – A Whole of Government Approach’.

Understanding the impacts a disaster has on a community is crucial for effective recovery operations. Historically, impact assessments have been ineffective for the two reasons, minimal or low quality data that limits useability and resource intensive processes that result in untimely and obsolete outputs.

NSW has reformed its processes to provide accurate and comprehensive impact assessments that can inform recovery operations in a timely fashion. Three products have been developed, each achieving a specific purpose within a varied timeframe.

Damage assessments provide spatial maps detailing damage to properties, businesses and infrastructure. The assessments are crucial to the recovery process by providing multiple agencies with information they require to inform their own operations. For example, Disaster Welfare Services used the damage assessments in the June 2016 NSW East Coast Low Storms to identify where outreach services should be provided.

NSW has revised its Emergency Operations Centre Impact Assessment template to facilitate comprehensive analysis of impacts to the local community. The assessment requires local agencies to provide interpretations of what the damages mean to the community. This assists with identifying what recovery arrangements are required.

The Whole of Government Impact Assessment Report synthesises information from all government data sources into a single report. The Report enables Recovery Coordinators, Recovery Committees and the executive recovery team to make operational decisions from a trusted authoritative and up to date source. The report provides maps, analysis and graphs to assist decision making.

The presentation at ANZDMC will describe the process undertaken, the learnings along the way and the results to date. Key to the project’s success was the Continuous Improvement Cycle, where new ideas were trialled during disaster events to identify what works and what can be improved.

For more information on the 2017 Australian & New Zealand Disaster & Emergency Management Conference and to secure your spot, visit www.anzdmc.com.au.

 

Enhancing Resilience in MÄori Communities

The 6th Australian and New Zealand Disaster and Emergency Management Conference will be held this month over 22 – 23 May at The Star Gold Coast (previously Jupiter’s), Queensland.

Ms Meagan Edhouse, Emergency Management Advisor, Community Resilience at Emergency Management Bay of Plenty, joins us this May to discuss ‘Enhancing Resilience in MÄori Communities as an Innovative Approach’.

The Bay of Plenty region in the North Island of New Zealand is vulnerable to a wide range of hazards, including natural hazards such as severe weather events , landslips, earthquakes, volcanic eruption and tsunami. The population is 28% MÄori with 38% of the region’s land in MÄori ownership. There are 34 iwi (tribes) , over 142 hapÅ« (sub tribes) and more than 200 marae in the region.

These marae often become the hub for the community when a disaster strikes. It was recognised that a unique approach was required to effectively engage with Maori communities for emergency planning, taking into account their cultural practises and protocols, language and values.

Emergency Management Bay of Plenty, in collaboration with relevant stakeholders, partner agencies and local iwi, delivered a successful pilot project in marae emergency preparedness planning.

This presentation highlights an innovative approach taken to improve engagement with Maori (the indigenous people of New Zealand) and provide effective customised resources for emergency planning.

The intended outcome is to increase the levels of resilience for marae communities, through greater levels of understanding of local risks and hazards, strengthened relationships between iwi and emergency management agencies and key stakeholders, and empowerment of iwi to take ownership of their emergency planning.

The collaborative process identified the need for the development of a national resource for emergency management professionals to assist them to engage with iwi, to support readiness, response, and recovery activities in their community. The development of the toolkit was greatly informed by the sharing of resources already being utilised across different regions and the collaboration of Civil Defence Emergency Management Groups across the country.

The toolkit was successfully launched nationally to emergency management staff, and relevant stakeholders in June 2016. This resource is now utilised to deliver emergency preparedness workshops to marae across the Bay of Plenty.

For more information on the 2017 Australian & New Zealand Disaster & Emergency Management Conference and to secure your spot, visit www.anzdmc.com.au.

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